The Different branch, Alioramus (1976)
Phylum : ChordataClass : ReptiliaOrder : SaurischiaSuperfamily : TyrannosauroideaFamily : TyrannosauridaeSubfamily : TurannosaurinaeGenus : AlioramusSpecies : A. remotus, A. altai
Late Cretaceous (70 - 65 Ma)
6 m long and  1 000 kg
Mongolia and Russia

An awful lot has been abstracted about Alioramus ever since a single, incomplete skull was discovered in Mongolia in 1976. Paleontologists believe this dinosaur was a medium-sized tyrannosaur closely related to another Asian meat-eater, Tarbosaurus, from which it differed in both its size and in the distinctive crests running along its snout.
As with many dinosaurs reconstructed from partial fossil specimens, though, not everyone agrees that Alioramus was a genuine tyrannosaur. Some paleontologists maintain that it was a juvenile Tarbosaurus, or perhaps not a tyrannosaur at all but a different kind of carnivorous theropod altogether (hence this dinosaur’s name, which means “different branch”).
A recent discovery shows that Alioramus was even more bizarre than previously thought. It turns out that this presumed tyrannosaur sported eight horns on its skull, each about five inches long, the purpose of which is still a mystery (though they were likely a sexually selected characteristic—that is, males with bigger horns had more of an opportunity to mate with females).

The Different branch, Alioramus (1976)

Phylum : Chordata
Class : Reptilia
Order : Saurischia
Superfamily : Tyrannosauroidea
Family : Tyrannosauridae
Subfamily : Turannosaurinae
Genus : Alioramus
Species : A. remotus, A. altai

  • Late Cretaceous (70 - 65 Ma)
  • 6 m long and  1 000 kg
  • Mongolia and Russia

An awful lot has been abstracted about Alioramus ever since a single, incomplete skull was discovered in Mongolia in 1976. Paleontologists believe this dinosaur was a medium-sized tyrannosaur closely related to another Asian meat-eater, Tarbosaurus, from which it differed in both its size and in the distinctive crests running along its snout.

As with many dinosaurs reconstructed from partial fossil specimens, though, not everyone agrees that Alioramus was a genuine tyrannosaur. Some paleontologists maintain that it was a juvenile Tarbosaurus, or perhaps not a tyrannosaur at all but a different kind of carnivorous theropod altogether (hence this dinosaur’s name, which means “different branch”).

A recent discovery shows that Alioramus was even more bizarre than previously thought. It turns out that this presumed tyrannosaur sported eight horns on its skull, each about five inches long, the purpose of which is still a mystery (though they were likely a sexually selected characteristic—that is, males with bigger horns had more of an opportunity to mate with females).

Notes

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